Results tagged ‘ Matt Treanor ’

Spare Parts

When you talk about the first World Series run by the Rangers, the names that come to mind are Josh Hamilton, American League MVP; Cliff Lee, mid-season acquisition and Yankee Killer in the ALCS; Michael Young, the long-time “Face” of the franchise; and Nelson Cruz, who can carry a team on his back for two-week stretches, including the playoffs.

Those players deservedly got a lot of the press, but another key to the Rangers first run to the pennant were the spare parts. Jarrod Saltalamacchia went on the DL after just two games. Enter last-minute Spring Training acquisition Matt Treanor. Treanor held down the fort so well until the July acquisition of Bengie Molina, Saltalamacchia never again wore a Rangers uniform. Salty was optioned to AAA after coming off the DL, then went to the Red Sox in a September deal.

The Rangers had a winning record during Nelson Cruz’ three trips to the DL in 2010, thanks to the emergence of David Murphy as a viable 4th outfielder. Murphy remains an integral piece of the Rangers today, though speculation grows he’ll become part of a deal sometime this summer.

Ian Kinsler also had two DL stints in 2010. Again, Texas survived just fine, especially in mid-August when Andres Blanco filled in for 19 games and hit .333 with 8 doubles and .818 OPS, playing sterling defense as well.

The pitching staff also had its moments. Rich Harden and Scott Feldman, expected to be the top two rotation pieces, never panned out. It was new acquisition Colby Lewis and CJ Wilson, moving from the bullpen to the starting rotation, who helped keep the Rangers above-board until the trade for Cliff Lee. Likewise, the bullpen got a boost when Alexi Ogando was recalled from Oklahoma City. All Ogando did was earn wins in his first three relief appearances and ended up being the Rangers 7th inning go-to guy.

The pattern repeated itself in 2011. When center fielder Julio Borbon went down in May with an injury, Endy Chavez was called up from Round Rock, hit .301 in 83 games and banished Borbon to the minors, where he remains today. Ogando again served as a vital piece, this time moving into the starting rotation when off-season signee Brandon Webb proved not ready to go out of Spring Training. Ogando thrived as a starter, making the All-Star team. Yorvit Torrealba was expected to be the primary catcher, until Mike Napoli had an offensive year that nobody saw coming.

The stars propel teams, but the spare parts are often the ones that give winning teams the extra edge. The previous 400 words were all written with Robbie Ross in mind.

Robbie Ross, Texas Ranger

Just a year ago today, Ross was pitching for High-A Myrtle Beach. The Rangers 2nd round draft pick in 2008, Ross compiled a 9-4 record with a 2.26 ERA as a starter  to earn a late season promotion to AA Frisco. In 6 games with Frisco, Ross was 1-1 with a 2.61 ERA. Those stats earned Ross an invite to big league camp for Spring Training in 2012.

Ross was expected to do what most rookies his age (21) do. Stick around big league camp for a couple of weeks, mop up a few games, then return to minor league camp, where he would most likely start the season at Frisco, maybe Round Rock if he was lucky.

Ross, however, didn’t recognize his long odds. He just did what he’d been doing since being drafted. He threw strikes. Because he threw strikes, he got outs. There were veteran southpaws in the Rangers camp this year, looking to fill the role vacated by Darren Oliver when he departed for the Blue Jays, chief among them Joe Beimel. He didn’t pitch badly, but a late camp injury ended his chances. Michael Kirkman, who contributed key late-season innings in 2010 but slipped in 2011, was another prime candidate. Kirkman struggled from the outset and has continued to struggle at Round Rock in 2012.

By the time Spring Training was over, Ross had leap-frogged everyone and earned a spot on the Rangers roster. He was expected to be brought around slowly, used in mop-up roles to get his feet wet. Most thought Ross would just hold down the fort until the Rangers either re-signed Mike Gonzalez or traded for another lefty in the pen.

All Ross has done is succeed, in whatever role the Rangers have asked him. Sunday, he was asked to replace another famous spare part, Alexi Ogando. Ogando, who was made a starter again when Derek Holland went on the DL, threw three hitless innings, then strained his groin legging out a bunt single that was supposed to be just a sacrifice bunt. Ross came in and this time threw four innings of 1-hit ball at the Giants and earning the victory. Ross is now 6-0 with a 1.30 ERA. If Ogando goes on the disabled list, Ross could be the Rangers starter this Saturday against the Astros.

Not bad for someone who wasn’t even projected to be in the big leagues until next year at the earliest. Let’s hear it for spare parts!

Sizing Up The Free Agents

The Hot Stove League has begun and, if you know anything about the Texas Rangers, it is this: Whatever you’re hearing in terms of buzz, it’s mostly speculation. Because once the Rangers make a move, it tends to be a surprise to everyone.

Last year in the off-season, the speculation was whether Cliff Lee would re-sign with the Rangers. Texas put on a hard-court press to get Lee to re-up with them. That IS what was reported. What nobody saw coming was what followed losing out on the Lee sweepstakes: the trade with Toronto that brought Mike Napoli to Texas and the signing of Adrian Beltre to a 5-year contract when just about every media source pegged Beltre as going to the Angels.

Jon Daniels is a cagey GM who is constantly thinking three moves ahead. If Plan A doesn’t work out, Daniels already has Plans B, C and maybe even D in mind. He also has a penchant for hammering out double moves, such as two years ago when he shipped Kevin Millwood and much of his salary to the Baltimore Orioles and used the salary savings and immediately signed Rich Harden to a one-year deal.

With new ownership having deep pockets and a team that’s been to back-to-back World series, it’s inevitable the Rangers are considered to be in the mix for just about every free agent out there this off-season. Already, Texas is being mentioned as a suitor for Albert Pujols and Prince Fielder, two of the biggest names out there. It makes sense from the standpoint that first base is the Rangers’ weakest offensive position. I’m almost willing to bet we will NOT see Pujols or Fielder in a Rangers uniform.

Even with more money to work with (ownership has already as much as committed to a $100 million plus payroll in 2012), I’m pretty sure Daniels is smart enough to know it’s still all about spending money smartly and that doesn’t always translate into the big-dollar guys.

First, let’s take a look at the Rangers’ own free agents and the likelihood of being re-signed.

Endy Chavez: Chavez was  a great comeback story, returning from two years of injuries to ably replace Julio Borbon when he went on the DL in May. Chavez probably did better in 2011 than Borbon would have had he not been injured. Still, Chavez is unlikely to return to the fold. The Rangers still have Craig Gentry as a back-up outfielder, Borbon will be back and Cuban defector Leonys Martin is already knocking ont he door waiting for his chance to roam center field. Good luck, Endy. Hope you get a good contract from someone.

Mike Gonzalez: The lefty was acquired from the Orioles and was on every Rangers post-season roster. Odds are pretty good Texas makes him an offer to stick around and, if Gonzalez wants a chance to win instead of the most dollars available, he’ll be glad to ink a new contract.

Darren Oliver: The Rangers’ designated LOOGY and the old man of the bullpen at 42, Oliver lives in Dallas and has indicated he’s leaning towards returning instead of retiring. If so, I’m positive he’ll re-up with Texas at a hometown discount to give himself one more shot at a World Championship.

Matt Treanor: I was a Treanor fan in 2010 and was happy when he came back for the stretch run in 2011. However, Treanor won’t be back unless Texas decides to part ways with Yorvit Torrealba, which I hope they don’t. Maybe he’ll sign a minor league deal with Texas, much like the one that brought him the Rangers way in 2010.

CJ Wilson: This is the multi-million dollar question. Will CJ come back or head for much greener pastures. Wilson is a West Coast guy, so speculation is rife for the Angels to be after him. Obviously the Yankees are going to be in the mix and will likely offer him the most money. Reports also have the Nationals interested, which I understand. He’d be a nice complementary piece to Strasbourg. I put the odds at 50-50 for Wilson to return. texas wants him back, but even with more money to play with, they don’t want CJ to break the bank.

That brings us to everyone else’s free agents. If Texas doesn’t go after Pujols or Fielder, who will they court? Here’s how I look at it. This year’s free agent class isn’t the strongest to begin with. In addition, Texas has VERY big decisions to make after the 2012 season, when Josh Hamilton, Nelson Cruz, Michael Young and Colby Lewis can all walk away to other teams. I think the Rangers are going to play small ball this year in the free agent market, looking for bargains and trying to fill specific needs. With that in mind, here are a few under the radar types I think Texas could be very interested in.

Mark Buerhle: This would be the highest dollar guy Texas could go for. Buerhle is a proven innings eater who would fit in well with the rangers pitching staff. I don’t think texas would sign both Wilson and Buerhle, so I’d say if they don’t get Wilson, they put their cards on the table for Buerhle.

Octavio Dotel: If you can’t beat ‘em, get ‘em to sign with you. Dotel has a World Series ring, a high strikeout rate and would be a great ROOGY for the Rangers.

Casey Kotchman: This is one of the most intriguing names out there. If the Rangers aren’t sold on Mitch Moreland as the answer at first base, they could package him in a trade and sign Kotchman. He might not have the sock potential of Moreland but he’s a great defensive player at first with just enough pop to make for a good fit in the Rangers line-up.

Roy Oswalt: He has Texas ties, he’d be very popular with the fans. He also has a history of back issues and is no spring chicken at 34. There is a possibility Texas will go for him, but I don’t know if they’re willing to pay the dollars Oswalt probably wants.

Jose Reyes: I don’t think this will happen, but it would be a classic Daniels move to trade the popular Elvis Andrus and pick up one the game’s most exciting players. The only reason I don’t really see this happening is because teen phenom Jurickson Profar may only be a couple of years away from the bigs, so texas wouldn’t want to commit more than two years for Reyes.

Joel Zumaya: This is another prime Jon Daniels possibility: signing a former All-Star who’s had physical problems to a low dollar contract. If he comes back to close to his former self, it’s a great investment. If not, you’re not out a lot of money.

There are a few other names out there Texas could conceivably have interest in: Todd Coffey, Kerry Wood, Heath Bell, Jonathon Papelbon, Matt Capps and maybe Hiroki Kuroda. The ones above, though, are my best bets to get strong interest from Texas.

 

The Kids Are Alright

Five days later…

As a fan, the sting of losing Game 7 is gone. Sure, it’s disappointing. I told a Cardinals fan I know that Game 6 made me feel like Charlie Brown, with Lucy pulling the football back at the last second. Twice. I still can’t quite find the desire to turn on a lot of Sports Talk radio, for fear of hearing pundits lay into my Rangers for the way they let this one get away, but I still have a wife who loves me (most of the time), children and grandchildren who love me (most of the time) and two dogs that love me all of the time (as long as I walk them and feed them), so life is good.

The off-season has begun and with it, the makeover of the Texas Rangers to put them in the best position possible to make yet another assault on a World Series Championship. Honestly, this may be as boring an off-season for Rangers fans as there will be.

Here’s the big drama: Will CJ Wilson be back and will the Rangers succeed in signing Japanese phenom pitcher Yu Darvish? Other than that, anything else that would happen to this Rangers team will qualify as a surprise.

Wilson is the only free agent of note for Texas. According to an ESPN.com report, CJ says there’s a “great chance” he’ll return to the Texas fold in 2012. Other reports have said the Rangers plan to cut ties with the lefty and proceed heavily towards getting Darvish in the fold. In this case, I’ll trust CJ’s actual words for now. Who knows, maybe both Wilson and Darvish will be part of the 2012 rotation. The Rangers are also said to be one of the favorites to get Darvish, a 25-year-old who compiled a 1.44 ERA in the Orient this past season.

I read something interesting today concerning Darvish and Japanese pitchers in general. Over in Japan, apparently, they still stick with a 4-man rotation instead of the stateside five. Darvish is said to have as many as ten different pitches at his disposal. The interesting point made was comparing Darvish to Daisuke Matsusaka. The article (in Baseball Prospectus) said when the Red Sox got Daisuke, they made him whittle his repertoire down to five pitches. It went on to speculate the combination of this and giving him four days rest between starts instead of the three he was used to could help explain Matsusaka’s underwhelming Red Sox career. If so, it will be interesting to see if the Rangers treat Darvish differently than the Red Sox did Daisuke (assuming the Rangers get Darvish, of course).

Texas exercised the option in Colby Lewis’ contract, as well as reliever Yoshi Tateyama. The latter signing could mean the end of the road in Texas for Darren O’Day, who is a sidearming righty like Tateyama (albeit with much more zip on the ball).

There will be some arbitration battles coming up. Obviously, Mike Napoli is going to garner a huge payday whether it goes to an arbitrator or not. There could be speculation the Rangers will cut ties with Yorvit Torrealba thanks to Napoli’s strong season. Torrealba is only going to be making a little over $3 million in 2012, so I have a feeling they’ll keep him.

Other than that, this team is pretty set. Most players are under contract already. There could be some second tier players released, like Endy Chavez, Matt Treanor and Andres Blanco, but those won’t change the makeup of this team very much.

Speculation has been raised about the rangers going after Prince Fielder or Albert Pujols to fill the one weak spot on the field, first base. I just don’t think Texas is going to get involved in those high dollars, preferring to use them on pitchers like Wilson and Darvish.

There are other items I could throw out there, but all in all, this shouldn’t be as dramatic an off-season as last year was.

 

No Offense: Cards 3, Rangers 2

What a shame. A very winnable game turns into a loss and, once again, the Rangers are looking at a must win on the road to avoid starting the World Series in an 0-2 rut.

CJ Wilson: Not great but good enough to win on most nights. Bullpen: Exceptional again. Unfortunately, the first batter for St. Louis to face the Rangers bullpen got a hit and that was the difference in the game.

I could rail about the patently absurd second out call on Adrian Beltre in the 9th inning, but it probably wouldn’t have made a difference in the game anyway. I just don’t understand how an experienced umpire can’t tell a ball has hit a player before entering the field of play. If nothing else, a player can’t fake being hit as quickly as Beltre reacted. For all I know, Beltre would have been out on the next pitch. Nonetheless, for an umpire that was an inexcusable error.

My total amount of time spent watching the St. Louis Cardinals in 2011 before tonight probably comprised a total of an hour and a half of time and most of that was in the playoffs. After one game, here are my impressions: 1) David Freese may be a good hitter, but as a third baseman he makes Michael Young look like Adrian Beltre in comparison. 2) Albert Pujols deserves every ounce of respect he’s given. 3) I was very surprised by Chris Carpenter’s body language. After reading Zach Greinke’s comments about how Carpenter’s mean look being an act, I never saw a mean look out of Carpenter tonight. If anything, his facial language looked negative most of the evening. 4) Yadier Molina’s arm is as good as advertised.

The Cards were good tonight. Credit to them. The Rangers pitching was good tonight. The Rangers defense was good tonight. The Rangers offense was not good tonight.

I know Carpenter is a good pitcher, but Texas really blew it against him tonight. I place this loss firmly on the Rangers offensive line-up. The Carpenter that pitched tonight was a pitcher Texas usually handles well and they didn’t, except for Mike Napoli and his no doubt shot over the right field fence.

Curious move of the night: Why did Ron Washington choose to send Esteban German to the plate as a pinch hitter for Ogando? The man hadn’t stepped to the plate since September 25th. Why not Yorvit Torrealba? I’d rather see Matt Treanor in that spot than German. I read a tweet that said statistically it wasn’t such a bad move, but I just can’t go along with it. I understood Gentry pinch-hitting the at bat before that. With one out, he was a speedy guy who’d be less apt to ground into a double play. German, though…Just don’t get it.

Longtime Rangers fan Pessimism Onset: Fans like me who have rooted for this team through over 40 years of mostly mediocrity get fits of positivity periodically: the positivity that we’re about to go down to defeat. Tonight’s point of positivity? When Arthur Rhodes came in to face Josh Hamilton in the 8th. Rhodes began 2011 with the Rangers. He failed miserably as a Ranger. He was released when Koji Uehara and Mike Adams were acquired. So naturally, the guy who was such a poor fit in Texas, took care of last year’s MVP with an easy fly out. I could blame it on Hamilton’s strained groin, which will likely affect his hitting throughout the Series, but it’s easier to chalk it up to another example of what being a long-time Rangers fan is like. The other shoe always seems to drop.

The onus is now on Colby Lewis to right the ship. Actually the onus is on the Rangers offense to perform like they should be performing. I’ll be the first to admit Game 2 has worried me since before the Series began. Jaime Garcia is the type of pitcher that has given the Rangers fits the last couple of years: a guy they’ll be seeing for the first time who may be more of a finesse pitcher than power pitcher. If that happens, Game 3 will find Texas in an 0-2 hole at the outset.

I still have confidence in my team. I just know that right now, as I write this, the Rangers team has more confidence in themselves than I have.

Thank You Seattle Mariners: Rays 4, Rangers 1

With a mere 27 games remaining on the 2011 schedule, anything that gets the Texas Rangers one step closer to clinching a playoff berth is welcome. Certainly, fans would prefer the Rangers take the drama out of it and just clinch a return trip to the playoffs by winning, winning again and winning some more.

Nice as it would be, it is not realistic. So on those days when the Rangers don’t win, a well-placed assist is always welcome. Such was what occurred Wednesday night, when the Mariners helped the Rangers out with a 2-1 come from behind victory over the Angels. It helped take the sting out of the Rangers 4-1 defeat by Tampa Bay and maintained the Rangers’ 3 1/2 game lead in the AL West.

Outside of the first inning, when they loaded the bases with one out, Texas never had much of a chance against James Shields. Some games you just lose because an outstanding pitcher throws an outstanding game and this was one of them. Shields was magnificent, throwing eight shutout innings and getting out of the aforementioned first inning by inducing an inning ending double play grounder from Mike Napoli.

Of more concern was the horrific performance of Alexi Ogando and the continued struggles of newly acquired Koji Uehara. Ogando lasted less than three innings, giving up only three runs but looking just awful out on the mound. Last night only confirmed my suspicion that Scott Feldman will replace Ogando in his next scheduled start Monday at the Trop. Uehara, meanwhile, came on to pitch the 8th and again gave up a home run, his 4th since joining the Rangers and in only 10 2/3 innings.

On the positive side of the ledger, rookie Mark Hamburger came on in the 9th, making his major league debut and tossing a scoreless inning. By the way, I will not make any Hamburger puns, as I’ve seen enough of them over the past two days to realize it’s already become trite. Matt Harrison, who took a rotation turn off, tossed two hitless innings and appears ready for his next start Sunday against the Red Sox.

 Series finale tonight with Adrian Beltre back in the Rangers line-up. Also activated is utility infielder Andres Blanco. The Rangers have also called up two players, now that rosters have expanded: infielder Esteban German and pitcher Merkin Valdez.  Mike Gonzalez and Matt Treanor also join the team tonight, while the Rangers have sent AAA reliever Pedro Strop to the Orioles to complete the trade for Gonzalez. More players will join the Rangers later, but will wait until Round Rock and Frisco complete their respective playoff series.

 

Welcome Back!

Yesterday the rumor mills were ablaze with possibilities of Lance Berkman joining the Rangers.

Didn’t happen.

24 hours later, two deals DID happen, all to provide the Texas Rangers with insurance as we head closer and closer to the post-season.

 

Matt Treanor at Rangers Fan Fest January 2011

Texas re-acquired Matt Treanor from the Kansas City Royals, apparently in a straight cash transaction. Treanor was a key member of the 2010 AL Champions who filled in valiantly when Jarrod Saltalamacchia fell out of favor with the organization and Taylor Teagarden struck out more than he put wood on the ball. Treanor was the Rangers’ regular catcher until the acquisition of Bengie Molina. Treanor’s a grinder who gets the utmost from his talent, which is major league minimal, but he’s a great influence in the clubhouse, he’ll work a pitcher for long at-bats and is familiar with the pitching staff. Treanor probably will sniff a Rangers post-season roster only if Mike Napoli or Yorvit Torrealba suffer a late-season injury. Meanwhile, he’ll be able to provide them with the occasional rest day down the stretch.

Acquisition #2 is Orioles southpaw relief pitcher Mike Gonzalez. Again, this is just an insurance policy for the most part. Gonzalez will serve as a left-handed specialist for the next month. He will only make the post-season roster if A) Darren Oliver gets hurt; or B) if the team they’re facing in the playoffs is particularly vulnerable against lefthanders. Otherwise, maybe he’ll make Koji Uehara feel more comfortable being a Ranger, since they were teammates just a month ago. Gonzalez was acquired for the very popular Player To Be Named Later.

Two deals giving the Rangers for post-season options. Now all they have to do is make it to the post-season.

The Perfect Set-Up: Rangers Sweep A’s

If the last seven days of baseball had been scripted for Texas Rangers fans, it pretty much followed said script to the letter.

After nine, count ‘em, nine consecutive days of having the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim staying a mere game behind the Rangers in the AL West, the week of August 8-14 stood as the best chance for Texas to put some more space between them and their closest competitors. While the Rangers were set to close their home stand with three games against last place Seattle, followed by three on the road with third place Oakland, the Angels were facing a six game road swing through Yankee Stadium and the Rogers Centre in Toronto.

Sure enough, the Rangers took two of three from the Mariners while the Yankees took two of three from LA, putting the Texas lead back up to 2. Then the Atleticos (they put the Spanish name for the team on their unis in Sunday’s game) cooperated fully, letting Texas sweep them for the second consecutive series. Meanwhile, the Blue Jays came from behind to win the rubber match with the Angels in extra innings Sunday to take their series 2-1. Thus the crucial week played just as it was hoped, with the Rangers gaining three games on the week to end the week 5-1 and with a 4-game margin over the Angels.

How important is this? It’s huge, considering the first and second place teams square off against each other for a four game set in LA beginning tomorrow night. Bottom line is, even if the Angels manage to sweep this upcoming series, Texas will still leave California Thursday night no worse than tied for first place. HUGE!

Game 1 of the Oakland series was a no doubter. New A’s Public Enemy #1, CJ Wilson, who made a few comments about Oakland that were a lot milder than the way they were taken, pitched six strong innings in pacing Texas to a 9-1 pasting of the A’s. The middle game of the set, a 7-1 final, was a lot closer than the final score indicates. Colby Lewis and Trevor Cahill matched 0′s for six innings, with Cahill tossing a no-hitter through 5. Texas finally broke through with two runs, followed by the A’s cutting the lead to 2-1. It wasn’t until after Cahill left the game that Texas teed off on the A’s relief corps, plating 5 insurance runs to run away with the decision.

Sunday’s finale should have been easy. Facing former Ranger Rich Harden, the Rangers struck for 3 in the first due to Harden pitching like, well, the Rich Harden who pitched for the Rangers in 2010. By the time Harden was gone (over 100 pitches in just 4 innings), the Rangers were comfortably ahead 6-0. Consistent Matt Harrison was on cruise control when, suddenly, the A’s decided to make a game of things. Taking advantage of well-timed hits sandwiched around a couple Rangers errors, Texas suddenly found the game tied at 6 heading into the 8th inning. A 1-out Mitch Moreland walk in the 9th, followed by a stolen base by pinch-runner Craig Gentry, set up David Murphy’s game winning 2-out single. Three Neftali Feliz-thrown outs later, the Rangers had their sweep and their four-game lead over the Angels. 

AMAZING STAT: Heading into Sunday’s finale, Texas stood at 68-52 on the season. One can easily say the Texas offense is nowhere as potent as it was in the World Series year of 2010. Josh Hamilton isn’t hitting for as high an average or with as much power as his MVP year. Ian Kinsler is having a down year with the bat. Elvis Andrus has regressed defensively. Yet Texas entered Sunday’s game with a better 120-game record than the 2010 team (they were 67-53 at this point). The reason? A better rotation in the #3-#5 slots than a year ago and a LOT more offense out of the catcher position with Mike Napoli and Yorvit Torrealba compared to Bengie Molina and Matt Treanor.

Four games in LA coming up. Reasonable expectation? Missing Dan Haren’s spot in the rotation works in the R’s favor and gives Texas a good chance to go at least 2-2 and maintain the 4-game lead. Too bad I won’t see every inning of every game. Can’t stay up that late and function well at work the next day like I used to. Having a lead when it’s time to retire for the night would be nice, though…

By the way, thank you Robinson Cano, for beating the Angels Thursday and thank you, Edwin Encarnacion, for your game-winning hit for the Blue Jays today!

 

Get The Brooms: Rangers 5, Red Sox 1

More than one article during the inexorably long Spring Training period made comment to the effect that in 2011, the Rangers will be the hunted instead of the hunter and how will they respond to that.

It’s a long season, but for the first three games, it sure looked like the new hunted was Bugs Bunny and the new hunter was Elmer Fudd. I only wish I had the audio of the Bugs baseball cartoon that has that wascally wabbit continually saying “WHAM! WHAM! WHAM!” because that’s exactly what the Rangers did to the Red Sox: 26 Runs, 11 HR’s in three games. WHAM! WHAM! WHAM!

 

dell-comics-bugs-bunny-155.jpgAnd to top it off, Matt Harrison did the honor of actually being the best Rangers pitcher of the weekend, better than both CJ Wilson and Colby Lewis. Harrison tossed a gem, seven innings of 5 hit one run ball with 8 strikeouts. I hope Harrison has finally turned a corner, but this is only one start. A year ago, Harrison outpitched Felix Hernandez in a no-decision in Seattle, but it was his only good start of the year. That said, yesterday may have been the best start Harrison has EVER had at the major league level and I sure hope it’s a sign of things to come.

Had a chance to hear a lot of AL West baseball on the long 8 hour drive to and back from Arlington. Heard the vaunted A’s defense commit five errors in their opener against the Mariners. Heard two of the Royals three wins over the Angels as well. Well done, Matt Treanor (3-run shot in the 13th to beat the Angels Sunday)! The Royals have endured a lot of misery over the past 15 years and radio broadcaster Denny Matthews has been there for all of them. So when I hear him comment that, from what he’s seen, the Angels have a long way to go as a team, that’s coming from someone who knows because he’s been living it. Maybe the Angels just aren’t as good as some think they are.

It’s early yet. Three games do not a season make. But it’s hard not to feel pretty giddy today after the beat-down that was inflicted on the pre-season favorites to win the AL Championship over the weekend. WHAM! WHAM! WHAM!

Opening Day Eve: Random Thoughts

While thinking of story ideas, so many random thoughts came to mind now that the regular season is upon us, it’s time for one of those hodgepodge columns with no defining topic…

  • In the Rangers last exhibition game against AAA Round Rock, Darren O’Day gave up yet another home run. That’s six now in his last 9 Spring Training innings and 12 HR in his last 22 innings, including the regular season and post-season of 2010. This is one pitcher I’m VERY worried about.
  • Key to the 2011 season? Let’s take injuries out of the equation. All teams have to deal with injuries. So, assuming a relatively injury-free year, the biggest key is Derek Holland. I see Colby Lewis having a better year than 2010, CJ Wilson an equal or slightly lower year. For his third go-round with the big club, it’s time for Holland to put it together. We’ve seen some tantalizingly good games from Derek, but it’s been more like three average to subpar outings for every great one. It HAS to turn around in the other direction for the Rangers to repeat in the West.
  • As if the feeling that the starting pitching depth isn’t as good as initially thought wasn’t bad enough, Michael Kirkman only lasted an inning and a third in the exhibition game last night. Kirkman left after taking a Nelson Cruz line drive to the elbow. Kirkman doesn’t think it’s anything for than a giant owwie, but it sure doesn’t help in the peace of mind department.
  • Second key to the 2011 season: Elvis Andrus in the 2 hole. He led the team in batting average with runners in scoring position in 2010. He’s good at bunting guys over to second and he’s a decent contact hitter. Unfortunately, Andrus had the lowest number of extra base hits of any everyday player in baseball last year as well. Maybe it was because he knew as the leadoff guy in 2010, the Rangers didn’t want power from him, just for him to get on base. Still, like Holland, Andrus HAS to step up his offensive game or he won’t be in the two hole for long.
  • I’ve been antsy all week waiting for the season to start. Will be in Arlington on Saturday with my oldest to see the Rangers get their AmericanLeague Championship rings before Colby Lewis matches up with John Lackey. Lackey played junior college ball right up the road from Dallas at Grayson County College in the Sherman-Denison area. The Rangers have a pretty good track record against Lackey over the past few years. I hope that continues on Saturday.
  • 18-Year-Ranger-Fan plans to see two of the three games between the Rangers and Orioles in Baltimore next week, along with Ranger Fan-In-Law. He’s also excited to see the Rangers High-A club in Myrtle Beach, as he’ll get a chance to see the Pelicans when they visit his hometown Frederick Keys this season. Looking forward to his reports this year as well.
  • Prediction 1: The Astros are my pick for the surprise team in baseball this year. They did pretty well after Roy Oswalt and Lance Berkman left last year. A bunch of young, hungry, unknown players. Even if the finish somewhere around 78-84, that would be more than many are expecting of them. I’ll also be interested in seeing how Clint Hurdle does managing the Pirates.
  • Prediction 2: The Phillies may win the NL East, but they won’t be as good as people think they’ll be with that starting staff. I’m guessing the absence of Chase Uttley is going to hurt the offense more than thought, making for a lot of low-scoring games for the Phils this year. I honestly wouldn’t be surprised if the Braves nose ‘em out for the division title.
  • I already miss Matt Treanor. I just looked at the roster the Royals are heading into 2011 with and I’m willing to bet Treanor misses the Rangers just as much right around now. KC is supposed to be very close to having a contending team, with a whole slew of young bucks ready to hit the big time. Let’s just say they haven’t arrived on 3/31/11.
  • I read a fan poster the other day who opines that when Jason Kendall comes off the Royals DL, Treanor will come back to the Rangers as the “player to be named” in the trade a couple weeks ago of minor league infielder Johnny Whittleman. I can actually see that happening.

 

    The regular season has arrived. Here’s hoping the expected bad weather doesn’t cause postponements of any of the six openers today.

And Just Like That…

This is what the end of Spring Training is like. Just two hours after my last post, word filters down that the Rangers have traded back-up catcher Matt Treanor to the Kansas City Royals for cash considerations.

Matt Treanor at Rangers FanFest 2011It’s not often the trade of a back-up surprises me, but this one did and I hate to see Treanor go. He was one of those intangibles guys and I think he’ll be missed by the Rangers. Treanor was CJ Wilson’s “personal catcher”. The pitching staff really appreciated his work behind the plate in calling a game. I think he had more 8+ pitch at bats than anyone in the Rangers line-up in 2010. He didn’t hit a lot, but he had a lot of quality at-bats and productive outs.

The move has several implications. It could mean the Rangers will go with a 13-man pitching staff at the outset of the season. Or, as was opined here a week or two ago, it could create an opening for Chris Davis to break camp with the big club.

Either way, Mike Napoli has now become the back-up catcher for Texas. Napoli is not known for his defense, and Ron Washington has often said he considers defense and game calling to be the primary focus of his catchers with offense coming last.

Can’t help but think more moves are coming. The next four days could be an interesting ride!

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