Archive for the ‘ Dailies ’ Category

#Bullpenisweak

Words to the effect of today’s headline are often used on Twitter as a crude laugh while also drawing attention to a sad fact of life for the baseball team.

It is, in fact, a fitting description of the Texas Rangers bullpen. Weak may even be an understatement.

In April, there was much consternation over the lack of punch in the Rangers offensive attack. As we approach the end of the season’s second month, we find the Texas offense is actually not too shabby and may soon improve further with the arrival of Josh Hamilton. Sadly, outside of a brief four game winning streak, the results in wins and losses haven’t improved appreciably and the bullpen carries a lion’s share of the blame.

Through May 16th, the Rangers bullpen was carrying an anemic 6 plus ERA for the month. For the season, the Texas relief corps has more blown saves than saves. In Saturday’s loss to the Cleveland Indians, the relief staff managed two blown saves in the same game.

Neftali Feliz After Striking Out A-Rod to end the 2010 ALCS, sending Texas to its first World Series

Neftali Feliz After Striking Out A-Rod to end the 2010 ALCS, sending Texas to its first World Series

The bullpen is now in flux. Neftali Feliz, while still officially the closer, did not close out Sunday’s 5-1 win over the Tribe, Shawn Tolleson did. After just two appearances, Kyuji Fukikawa got released. The same fate earlier befell Stolmy Pimentel and Logan Verrett. Spencer Patton has come and gone, as has Jon Edwards. The newest additions to the pen are Tanner Scheppers, who started the season ineffectively in Arlington, and Ross Ohlendorf, who Sunday made his first big league appearance in two years.

If the latter two prove effective, it provides Texas a potent late inning triumvirate. What would still be missing, though, is a closer. If Feliz can’t hold down the job, and his last few outings have shown that as a distinct possibility, there is no proven option to replace him. Plenty of teams have caught lightning in a bottle with an unknown closer coming out of nowhere. The Rangers haven’t had a lot of success in that area, with one notable exception: Neftali Feliz in 2010. Five years ago, Feliz unseated Frank Francisco and helped lead the Rangers to their first World Series. Five years later, Feliz may soon suffer the same fate as Francisco.

The Texas offense is recovering. Now it’s the bullpen’s turn. If they don’t turn it around, all the offense in the world won’t help the Rangers.

Good Problems To Have

The Texas Rangers find themselves in last place in the AL West, a familiar perch since 2014. Yet scoring back to back wins for the first time in 2015, over the first place Houston Astros no less, adds more good problems to the Rangers. Here are the problems, in order of when they’ll crop up.
Mitch Moreland Comes Off The DL
Before an elbow issue forced him to the DL, Moreland was one of only two bright spots in the Texas offensive lineup, hitting .304 with a homer and 9 RBI in 16 games. Prince Fielder even agreed to DH more because he saw Mitch was the better defensive 1st baseman.
The problem is the guy Texas brought up to replace him. Kyle Blanks, picked up on waivers from Oakland in the off season, has been nothing short of sensational. In his first six games, Blanks is hitting at a robust .391 clip, with 3 home runs and 5 RBI. Blanks can play left field, so when Moreland is ready for activation, the Rangers could move Blanks there. That, however, brings up Good Problem #2.
Josh Hamilton Returns
Assuming Moreland returns to 1st base/DH duties, Blanks gets moved to left field, leaving no spot for Carlos Peguero. Now what happens when Josh Hamilton is deemed ready to go? If Blanks continues his hot hitting, you don’t get rid of him. It appears the only choices would be releasing Jake Smolinski, who manager Jeff Bannister loves for his hustle, or offer Rule 5 pick Delino DeShields back to the Astros. DeShields offers speed on the bases. While Smolinski is probably the better player overall, DeShields might have more worth to the team. I fear Jake will be out of a job soon.
This brings us to the Good Pitching Problems.
Derek Holland Returns
Dutch is likely the first rotation piece returning. After a rocky start, Ross Detwiler has recovered to give Texas consecutive strong starts. Yet the success of Nick Martinez leads one to the conclusion Detwiler will be odd man out when Holland is ready. Expect Ross to move to the bullpen. But what happens in the second half when…
Martin Perez And Matt Harrison Return
Oof. Now it gets dicey. Perez is returning from Tommy John surgery, Harrison from back surgery. There’s no guarantee Harrison comes back but signs thus far is positive. Perez should be ready after the All Star break. If both come back, then what? Colby Lewis and Martinez have been the best starters, Wandy Rodriguez has done well so far and Yovani Gallardo is who he is. A quality piece or two will have t p go.
Since Perez still has options available, if I’m the Rangers, I just might let Perez spend the rest of the season in Round Rock. Then he’ll be more than ready for 2016. A successful Harrison return means someone has to go. If the Rangers aren’t in the pennant chase, I think Gallardo is traded for a prospect or two.

Lots of problems, but these are good ones to have for a change.

It’s Josh. It’s Gonna Be Something Weird

The Prodigal Son Returns

The Prodigal Son Returns

Just a little over two months ago, Jon Daniels answered questions from fans at the annual Texas Rangers FanFest. At the time, Josh Hamilton’s self-reported relapse had not been reported, but there were rumblings Hamilton might be on the trade block. One fan asked Daniels if there would be any interest in the Rangers making an offer. Daniels, who is known for never commenting on moves before they’re made, let out a laugh and answered in one word: No.

This wasn’t a deflection or even a bluff. It was as categorical a “No” as ever came from Daniels’ mouth. He had not one bit of interest in re-acquiring the services of the Rangers best player in the 2010-2011 World Series teams.

Yet here we are, just a few months later, holding a press conference and re-introducing Josh Hamilton to the DFW (and national) media.

This is NOT a Jon Daniels move. This one came from up top, from ownership itself. Arte Moreno of the Angels and Bob Simpson talked on the phone and made a deal. They ran it through MLB and suddenly, Josh Hamilton is a Ranger again.

It’s a very club-friendly situation. The Rangers are only on the hook for about $6-$7 million of Hamilton’s salary over the next three years. Moreno is chipping in about $60 million, more or less, over the same stretch.

While it isn’t a Jon Daniels move, because the money is so little it IS a classic Daniels type of move: low risk, high reward. Daniels has loved getting players on the cheap. Sometimes it’s worked, like with Vlad Guerrero in 2010, Colby Lewis in 2010 and Neal Cotts in 2013. Other times it hasn’t, like with Brandon Webb, Roy Oswalt, Manny Ramirez and Carlos Pena.

I don’t know what to make of the Hamilton situation. I know the Rangers are probably the best team equipped to handle his personal issues, but the Rangers are a baseball team, not a rehab facility. I know Hamilton isn’t the player he was in 2010-2011 and at 34, his best years are officially behind him. As much as the Metroplex loved him in the World Series years, they have bitter memories of the way he performed in his last weeks with the team on the field followed by some ill-advised comments he made after signing with the Angels. He’s also shown that he’s always taken his God-given talent for granted and hasn’t been able to make the adjustments needed to compensate for the deterioration of those skills.

But I also know he has more home run potential at Globe Life Park than the Big A in Anaheim and, even with diminished skills, can probably man left field more capably than Jake Smolinski, Carlos Peguero and Ryan Rua, both offensively and defensively. If he doesn’t pan out, it hasn’t cost the Rangers much money at all. If he does, Arte Moreno’s paying him to play for his team’s rival, which could really blow up in his face.

It’s still going to be at least three weeks or a month before Hamilton puts on a Rangers uniform again for an actual game. There’s a lot of time between now and then. The only thing for certain is this: People are going to be watching the Rangers again, if only to see how this new relationship works out.

 

So What Do We Know So Far?

Star of the WeekTwo weeks into the season, the Texas Rangers stand at 5-8, in last place in the AL West, albeit just a game and a half out of first. The season is still early but it’s not too early to give a State of the Team address. Here are the takeaways from the season’s first 8% of the schedule:

Thank God For Nick Martinez

It could change rapidly but the big league sophomore has been the Rangers’ best pitcher, starter or reliever. Martinez has gone seven innings in each of his first two starts and has yet to surrender an earned run in getting off to a 2-0 start. Without Martinez, the Rangers pitching staff would be lowly indeed. Colby Lewis has been OK, Yovani Gallardo slightly below average and Ross Detwiler abysmal to the point you’d be hard-pressed to find a single Rangers fan in favor of letting him make another start ever. On top of that, no sooner had fans resigned themselves to being without Yu Darvish for the year then the new expected ace, Derek Holland went down for two months with a shoulder issue. Anthony Renaudo wasn’t the answer in one start. The chorus of fans singing for promoting Chi Chi Gonzalez is growing.

The Bullpen Is A Mess

Despite bright spots like Anthony Bass in long relief and Shawn Tolleson in the 7th inning, nobody else in the pen is rising to the challenge. Nowhere was that more evident than Sunday’s gut-wrenching 11-10 loss to the Seattle Mariners. Tanner Scheppers, in his second game back from the DL, couldn’t find the strike zone in the 8th, walking the bases full. Rookie Keone Kela, seen by many as the heir apparent for the closer’s role, showed he’s not ready for prime time, walking in one of the runs after relieving Scheppers. Closer Neftali Feliz was forced to try to get a 5-out save and couldn’t get the job done, giving up a 2-run single in the 8th, then two more runs in the 9th to blow the save and get the loss. The Rangers firemen have acted more like arsonists.

Prince Fielder

Prince Fielder

Thank God For Prince Fielder

The big guy doesn’t have a single home run and leads the AL in singles of all things. He’s also been the Rangers’ steadiest hitter. He’s beating the shift by going the opposite way, which is why he’s getting a lot of singles. He’ll eventually get the power stroke going but it’s going to require Adrian Beltre and Shin-Soo Choo to start hitting the way they can. Fielder won’t see better pitches until the guys hitting behind him start giving pitchers something else to think about.

New Year, Same Problems

2014 was a record-setting injury year for the Rangers and 2015 isn’t starting much better. Derek Holland is out for two months, left fielder Ryan Rua sprained his ankle, then discovered he has a stress fracture in his foot, which will keep him out for a while. Choo and Mitch Moreland have missed games already with minor ailments, Scheppers just returned from the DL. Texas is a slightly deeper team than they were a year ago but can still ill-afford many more injuries.

Elvis Andrus: $15 million man

Is Elvis In The Building?

What’s happened to Elvis Andrus? Never a scary offensive presence, now his defense seems to have regressed. Elvis makes his living being a brilliant defender first, a decent running threat second. Thus far, he’s not hitting, he’s not running and he’s not fielding. As of yesterday, he was the lowest rated position player by WAR in baseball. This HAS to improve.

In Conclusion…

The season is not off to a good start. Texas is once again resembling a last place team. They will hit better. There are too many pieces with good track records who have started out slowly. Pitching is another issue altogether. The Rangers need more innings from their starters and a couple more bullpen pitchers to step up. Otherwise it’ll be another long year in Arlington.

85 or 64 Wins? Whose Prediction Is Closer?

Star of the WeekOne thing is clear, though not scientifically proven, by reading fan comments on social media and message boards: most of them think their teams are better than what they’ve shown.

 

I figure on average, fans think their baseball teams are about ten wins better than the number of wins they end the season with. Even fans who know their teams will be terrible figure they can’t suck as badly as they eventually show us they do. On the other end of the spectrum, one only has to look at teams that win 100 games a year routinely, as the Yankees did in the early 2000’s, to know that their fans thought they should have won 110 games every year, if not more. This is really the “Backseat Manager” effect, that strange affliction that tells us we could do a better job managing our team than the current man in the position.

 

All this as preface to this Rangers fan still thinking, even without Yu Darvish, his team still is capable of being an 85 win team. The odds are great that they won’t get to 85. The bullpen beginning the season is nothing to brag about. The offense has the core back from injury but not enough depth to deal with any injuries to that core again. The starting rotation is actually the strong point despite the loss of their ace. It’s certainly a stronger rotation front to back than the one the Rangers rolled out most nights in 2014. Yeah, 85 wins seems a tad optimistic, but dang it, that’s the potential this team has.

 

Even if I’m ten wins off, 75 wins is a darn sight better than Bruce Bukiet thinks Texas will do. I should say what Bukiet’s mathematical model says they will do. Bukiet has the skins. He’s a mathematician who also runs a gambling analysis website. His winner’s picks have been pretty accurate. Here’s what CBS News wrote about Bukiet’s predictions last year and the chart of this year’s picks:

 

“Before the start of the 2014 season, Bukiet correctly predicted that Detroit would go on to win the American League Central, the Dodgers would win the National League West, St. Louis would win the Central and Washington would win the NL East.”

Bukiet 2015 Predictions

 

What I quibble with is not the top but the bottom of the standings. Bukiet’s mathematical model says the Rangers will finish 64-98 in 2015. Let that sink in. 64 wins. The Rangers of a year ago won 67 games, most of them without Prince Fielder, Shin-Soo Choo, Derek Holland and Mitch Moreland. Darvish missed about the last quarter of the season and Jurickson Profar, the expected second baseman, played zero games. Zero.

 

Fielder is back this year, as is Choo and Moreland. Holland is here for the whole season. Colby Lewis has a year’s experience on his new hip and was visibly better in the second half of 2014 than the first half. Nick Martinez and Rougned Odor are two sophomores with a year of experience under their belts.

 

In other words, barring injury (and every pre-season prediction doesn’t consider injury), the Rangers offense is better than it was a year ago, the starting rotation is better than it was a year ago. The bullpen begins the year sketchy but the reinforcements on the DL are not expected out for long.

 

Maybe my 85 win hopes are ten games better than they’ll probably finish, but Bukiet’s 64 win prediction? No way.

Texas-Oakland kicks off the season Monday night. Time to forget last year and make this year count.

baseball-bat-and-ball-on-grass-overhead-view

 

 

3 Reasons NOT To Break Up The Texas Rangers

Adrian Beltre 2Several stories have appeared nationally suggesting it’s time for Jon Daniels to bite the bullet and tear down the Texas Rangers in order to build them up again. Nobody is more forthright and insistent on this than MLB Network’s Jim Bowden, himself a former GM.

 

Overall, the mantra of these national scribes is: the Rangers are going nowhere this year, so why not get what you can for the pieces you can get a return on. This is often brought up at the same time as speculation that the Rangers are after Cole Hamels to provide them with an ace while Yu Darvish is out for the season.

 

Not a single game has been played in the 2015 regular season, yet already the Rangers are given up for dead.

 

I’m here to tell you, now is NOT the time to tear down the Texas Rangers. In fact, now is a great time for Daniels to stand pat and play the hand he’s been dealt for 2015. Here’s three reasons why.

 

Joey Gallo Isn’t Ready Yet

Along with his insistence that now is the time to trade Adrian Beltre, Bowden ties it together with the call for Rangers uber-prospect Joey Gallo to start his major league career as the new Rangers third baseman. Why someone who’s worked at the top of the MLB food chain would suggest this is puzzling. For all his prodigious power potential, Gallo isn’t ready for the majors yet. He’s only had about 250 at bats at the AA level and he struck out almost 120 times in those at bats. A K% like that does not spell “Big League Ready” in anybody’s book but Bowden’s. So, if the Rangers traded Beltre, who plays third base? Nobody of any consequence. And if you’re using Beltre as a chip to acquire Hamels, the Phillies aren’t going to throw in a big league third baseman as well.

Prince Fielder

Prince Fielder

 

The Biggest Contracts Have The Least Return

Outside of Beltre, the three biggest Rangers contracts belong to Prince Fielder, Shin-Soo Choo and Elvis Andrus. Fielder and Choo are coming off injury-plagued years and Andrus had arguably the worst season of his career in 2014. In other words, their trade value is at the lowest it could possibly be. The Rangers would get very little return in players. Maybe a little salary relief, but not much in players. Derek Holland might fetch a decent return but Texas isn’t about to part with one of their best pitchers when putting together a decent rotation is the key towards reaching the post-season.

 

Two Years From Today

Joey Gallo isn’t ready this year, but he probably will next year. Also ready in the next year or so will be catcher Jorge Alfaro and pitcher Chi Chi Gonzalez, who nearly made the club THIS year. Martin Perez is coming back from Tommy John surgery this year, Darvish will be back next year. Heck, we might even put Jurickson Profar back in the mix, who could be back next year as well. The point here is, while this year’s Rangers may not make the playoffs (and I think they’ll be better than a last place team), the 2016 Rangers could feature Gallo and Alfaro as rookies. If they become the big leaguers scouts think they will, the 2017 Rangers will have one of the most potent offenses in the AL with Gallo, Alfaro and Rougned Odor, even if Fielder has aged into a 20 HR hitting DH. Meanwhile, the starting rotation will feature Darvish, Holland, Perez and Gonzalez.

 

Not every prospect pans out but there’s every reason to believe the ones who are just a year away from Arlington are going to be special.

 

Break up the Rangers? Even if this season is a rough one, there’s enough on the horizon to stand pat. The window may be opening again soon.

A Team Takes Shape

One week from Opening Day and the Opening Day roster is starting to take shape for the Texas Rangers.

Gone are non-roster veterans Ryan Ludwick and Nate Shierholtz. Nick Tepesch and Anthony Ranaudo will not appear in the starting rotation. At this point, only the utility infield position is available on the offensive side and three bullpen slots are open.

Here’s what the Rangers are looking like so far:

1B Prince Fielder

2B Rougned Odor

SS Elvis Andrus

3B Adrian Beltre

C  Robinson Chirinos

C Carlos Corporan

DH Mitch Moreland

LF Ryan Rua

LF Jake Smolinski

CF Leonys Martin

RF Shin-Soo Choo

OF Delino DeShields, Jr.

The only minor surprise here is DeShields making the team as the 5th outfielder. A Rule 5 pick who’s never played above Double A, DeShields’ speed ended up being the deciding factor that sent the more powerful Ludwick and Shierholtz to pondering what to do next with their careers.

The only remaining offensive position open is utility infielder. Adam Rosales is still the favorite to get that slot. He’s had a good camp and was a good complementary piece a year ago. Yet there are still 4 utility infield candidates still in camp: Rosales, Ed Lucas, Elliot Johnson and Tommy Field. Field has been a slight surprise. The former Texas State athlete has played in just about every game in spring training and shown some pop with two home runs. Field has had a couple of cups of coffee in the bigs with Colorado and the LA Angels, but got released by both the Angels and the Pirates last year. I still don’t think Field makes the club but will instead be the starting second baseman at AAA Round Rock. I do think if Rougned Odor has a sophomore slump that Field would become a consideration as a starting replacement instead of Rosales, who would stay in a utility role. Lucas and Johnson? They’ll probably be released and signed just before Opening Day by another club.

Over to the pitchers. Here’s your Rangers rotation:

Yovani Gallardo

Derek Holland

Colby Lewis

Ross Detwiler

Nick Martinez

Martinez won the 5th starter slot on the basis of a strong spring 0.84 ERA, capped off by six scoreless innings in his last start. He ended 2014 strong and came out firing bullets in ’15. Tepesch, who also spent most of last season in Texas, showed the same tendencies that have dogged him in his career thus far. Great the first time through the order, considerably more hittable the second and third times through. He still has a shot at making the team in long relief, where he’d only need to face a line-up one time through.

The bullpen is more problematic. There are seven openings and thus far, these are the only sure bets:

Neftali Feliz (closer)

Tanner Scheppers (8th inning)

Shawn Tolleson (7th inning)

Sam Freeman

Freeman is a southpaw just picked up from the Cardinals. Before his acquisition, rookie Alex Claudio was the only lefty remaining in camp and he was starting to have troubles against left-handed batters in games. Freeman has a few years in the bigs under his belt and has a bullpen slot even though he just joined the team.

As for the other three slots? It’s anyone’s guess. A good case can be made for rookie Keone Kela, who has yet to give up a run in 8.1 innings this spring. He’s allowed only two hits and struck out 10. Other candidates are Tepesch (10.38) ERA, Jon Edwards (1.69, 17 K’s in 10.2 IP), Phil Klein (9.00 ERA), Kyuji Fujikawa (1.35 ERA), Lisalverto Bonilla (9.00 ERA) and Anthony Bass (9.00 ERA). Ross Ohlendorf  (0.00 ERA, 1 hit and 11 K’s in 5.1 IP) will have a role with the Rangers, but minor injuries will keep him off the active roster Opening Day. Rangers brass hope he’ll be ready by May.

The bullpen doesn’t sound very impressive, but most teams don’t know how good their bullpen truly is for at least the first third of the season. You can also bet at least one waiver claim will bring someone new to the roster and at least one other slot becomes interchangeable with a shuttle going back and forth from Arlington to Round Rock.

Seven days left to Opening Day. It can’t get here soon enough.

It Means NOTHING…Doesn’t It?

Once you get past a certain age (I like to think it’s no later than 30), you learn not to sweat the Spring Training records. By then, you’ve followed the game long enough to know that the rookie who hits close to .400 in the spring suddenly becomes a .195 hitter when the games count and finds himself back in the minors by May 1st. Likewise, the team that went 25-7 over the long exhibition campaign could very well be the team that finishes 38 games out of first place when October rolls around.

How can anyone put stock in spring training records? After all, the players who start the game are usually gone by the 5th inning. In the early games, they only get one at bat before calling it a day. Most of the scoring comes from minor league guys, some of whom you didn’t even realize were playing in your team’s system. Heck, you didn’t know they played in ANYONE’s system.

So why does anyone look at what goes on in Spring Training as a harbinger of what is to come in the regular season? Because occasionally that .400 Spring Training hitter becomes the Rookie of the Year. And every so often, that 100 win team favored to win the World Series was the same one that went 25-7 in the exhibition games. It usually isn’t the case, but sometimes it does happen.

Rangers-Dodgers, 3/21/15 at The Alamodome, San Antonio

Rangers-Dodgers, 3/21/15 at The Alamodome, San Antonio

Still, your humble scribe is of the age that he knows exhibition records and stats mean absolutely nothing. I know that. I REALLY KNOW THAT! Yet here I sit, looking at the results of the last six exhibition games of the Texas Rangers: 11-11, 6-11, 4-4, 3-11, 2-12 and 0-8. The tentative Rangers Opening Day starter, Yovani Gallardo, gave up 8 runs in 4.2 innings in his most recent outing and now has an ERA of 11.32 on the spring. Also getting shelled this week were potential Rangers rotation members Anthony Renaudo (4 runs & 3 home runs in 4 innings), Lisalverto Bonilla (6 earned runs in 4 innings), Anthony Bass (8 runs in 2/3 of an inning) and Nick Tepesch (3 runs in 4 innings).

Jamey Wright and Joe Beimel, two major league veterans looking to help the Rangers this year, have spring ERA’s of 11.57 and 33.00 respectively.

I repeat: It’s just Spring Training. Some veteran pitchers get ready by working on just certain pitches in a game. Some hitters just focus on hitting to the opposite field one game and working walks in another. Exhibition games are just that: exhibitions that mean nothing in the grand scheme of things. Plus, four of the aforementioned six games were “split squad” games, with only half a major league team at best.

Still, I saw the second of the two game set the Rangers played against the Dodgers in the Alamodome, an 11-3 loss. The Dodgers hit 5 home runs in the first game, an 11-6 pasting. It took them just one pitch to have a 1-0 lead in the first inning of Game 2. It was a pitiful performance all around for Texas. Renaudo and Bonilla weren’t fooling the Dodgers hitters at all. Meanwhile, the Texas offense could manage only three hits in the first 7 innings against Los Angeles pitching. Two Rangers tried to steal, two got caught stealing. A 3-run 8th inning home run by one of those “Who?” players, David Lyon, kept the game from being a shutout. Then the Rangers followed it up by bringing the full team to play the Mariners on Sunday, where they managed only 6 singles and one extra base hit, a double, in the first 7 innings.

The mantra of the new Rangers skipper, Jeff Bannister, is “Never, ever give up!” Over the last six exhibition games, they may not have ever given up but it sure didn’t look like they were trying very hard either. But it’s the exhibition season. It isn’t about the wins and losses, it’s about the process. It means NOTHING…doesn’t it?

Fall Back For Texas? Yes, Please!

Die-hard Texas Rangers fans will go see their team whenever the opportunity presents itself. One need only see the crowds at Globe Life Park in the middle of the summer when game time temperatures hover in the triple digits.
But of course, baseball owners also want the casual fan to show up. That’s where they make their money.
During the “good” years from 2010-2013, the product the Rangers put on the field was such that casual fans still showed up in droves in the heat of the summer. In 2014, when the wheels came off the bus, not so much.
It was with this in mind that my ears perked up when I heard the news that Dan Flynn (R-Canton) had introduced a bill in the Texas legislature to eliminate Daylight Savings Time in the Lone Star State.
Naturally my first thought was “Why mess with a tradition?” But the more I thought about it, the more it made sense.
EARNS EXXON MOBILEDaylight Savings Time has been presented to the consumer as a way to save energy. More daylight, less lights on in the house, lower energy usage. The problem here in Texas is, that savings is more than offset by the heavier use of air conditioning DST causes families.
Let’s expand the case now to the Texas Rangers. Most Rangers games start at 7:05 Central Daylight Time in the summer months of June, July and August, the hottest months of the year. My friend Tim Smith, chief meteorologist at KRGV-TV in the Rio Grande Valley tells me the high temperature of the day in Texas typically occurs between 3 and 8 pm during the summer. That means a Rangers game could start at 7:05 in 98 degree heat and, an hour later, it could be 101 with the sun still out.
So, let’s imagine a mid-July night. It’s 98 degrees at game time. The sun is right in the eyes of the fans in the left field seats (the left fielders too). An hour later, 3 degrees warmer and that sun is still there and will be for about another half hour. By the time the sun sets, the game is almost half over and it’s still 100 degrees.
Now let’s take the same game, except now there’s no Daylight Savings Time. Now the 7:05 start is what the conditions are like at 8:05 CDT. It might be 100 at game time, but sunset is only 30 minutes away and you know hot temperatures are easier to tolerate when the sun isn’t beating down on you. And the slow cool off starts in the second or third inning instead of the 5th or 6th.
That’s a recipe that should bring more casual fans to the park, even if the team isn’t contending.
This isn’t just an Arlington thing. The same would be true in minor league parks in Frisco, San Antonio, Round Rock, Midland, Corpus Christi and numerous independent league towns in Texas.
As a baseball fan, I say Daylight Savings Time in Texas is past its prime and should be retired. If you’re with me, call your state representative and tell them to support Representative Flynn’s bill!

Talking Rangers on BBA Live! 03/10

I was pleased to take part in last night’s edition of BBA Live, the podcast of the Baseball Bloggers Alliance. Life after Yu, Roogie Odor and Derek Holland were among the topics. Give it a listen when you have a chance!
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/mets-public-record/2015/03/11/bba-live

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