The Minority Manager Update

Ron Washington and Art Howe in the dugout.

Ron Washington (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A year ago, I engaged in an exercise to determine where Texas Rangers skipper Ron Washington stood on the all-time wins chart compared to other African-American managers in major league baseball.

At the time, I was both intrigued and mortified to find that since the color barrier was broken in the managerial ranks in 1975, only 15 different African-Americans over a 27 year span were hired as a manager in Major League Baseball. Of those 15, only five: Dusty Baker, Frank Robinson, Cito Gaston, Hal McRae and Jerry Manuel were blessed to manage again after their first job (although Gaston’s second job was with the same team, the Toronto Blue Jays).

Meanwhile, between the start of the 1975 season and the start of the 2012 season, there were 338 changes in managers. Of those, only 23 jobs went to African-Americans, less than 7 percent. An additional 27 jobs went to Hispanic managers, just under 8 percent.

Updating for entering the 2013 campaign, there were two in-season managerial changes in 2o12 and six changes to start the 2013 season. I’m pleased to note another African-American has broken into the managerial ranks with the hiring of Bo Porter as the Houston Astros skipper.

Bo Porter

Bo Porter (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As to where Ron Washington ranks, he remains the sixth winningest African-American manager with 520 wins entering 2013. He will likely stay there at the end of 2013, as he stands 107 wins behind Don Baylor for 5th place on the list. Dusty Baker is number one with 1581 wins and counting.

I still think in this day and age that Major League baseball has not done a very good job in helping to increase minority hires among the managerial ranks. Only five of this year’s 30 managers are from minority groups. What’s even sadder is how African-American representation in the player ranks continues to fall and how the Texas Rangers, managed by Ron Washington, are a prime example of that.

The 2012 Rangers did not have a single African-American player on the roster for the entire 2012 season. This was the first time since the 1960 Kansas City Athletics that an MLB team failed to have a single African-American ballplayer on their roster for a season.

Baseball as a whole is as popular as ever. People love going to the games. Yet baseball has a problem in getting African-American youth interested in the game, which is a shame. Baseball was the first major sport to break the color barrier. I’d hate to see it become the first sport to lose that representation altogether.

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